Posts Tagged ‘Rob Bowden’

Seeing the abundant good, downplaying the small annoyances

Friday, 22 February 2008

How could one or two people behaving ridiculously completely wind me up, when I was literally surrounded by several other people choosing to give up their time to help me out with some serious work? I just mustn’t let them, that’s all.

In that vein, my housemate has offered to lend me her camera for crochet progress pics, which I’ve just taken, to get me through until I get mine fixed (if I’m organised I’ll get that begun tomorrow). I took all the pictures quite quickly, so the projects are a bit rucked up, I’m afraid, but you’ll get the idea.

Here’s the Seraphina:

The FrouFrou. (I amn’t staying exactly in the order the pattern suggested; instead of counting out where to start the fronts from, and risk making a fatal error, I’ve sewn up the sleeves already and begun from there. It looks a bit lop-sided because I’ve begun one front and not the other.):

The finished Sea Swirls Tablecloth. (You aren’t going to believe me that I ironed it flat now, are you? Obviously my blocking technique needs some work!):

The books are easy, as they don’t require my taking photos.

55. Living Kaddish by Rabbi Gedalia Zweig

As it says on the cover, the stories in this anthology are inspiring, both as to the importance of saying and facilitating Kaddish, and also more generally as to the taking on of commitments. It ends with some resources (explanations, suggestions, translation & transliterations) to help those for whom Kaddish is a new concept or experience. (It is not and does not claim to be a complete study of the subject.)

I am most thankful I wasn’t reading this book in a case of personal need (more because it was around, in fact).

56. Destination Detectives: United Kingdom by Rob Bowden

This was actually a pair of books, from Raintree’s Freestyle and Freestyle Express collections. Each one has the same photographs and basic information on the same page number, however the Express edition is written for those who find reading more difficult, with shorter, less complex sentences, less detail and a bigger font. They would work well in a group setting, where everyone can go to the same page number, and discuss the same pictures and information. This particular pair gives an overview of the United Kingdom, its countries and some of its weird and wonderful customs.

57. Usborne Famous Lives: Captain Cook by Rebecca Levene

Another in this series, and this is probably the person covered that I knew least about beforehand. I did think I’d heard of some controversy over Captain Cook, but this book doesn’t mention it. I could be wrong, quite easily.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.