Subsuming the Centre

I’m still trying to get my scanner do a camera’s job, and so this picture shows the new stitches around the edge of my game piece well enough, while scrunching the middle rather badly.

As you can see, I haven’t really learnt to do bullion stitches well. I need to practise those to get them even.

72. Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley

Wow. This did not turn out quite as I had come to expect it to, from osmosis of the story through the general culture, or even from the earlier chapters. The Creature is both greyer and more black and white morally than I had anticipated, and while Victor Frankenstein remains emotionally immature he does display slight glimmerings of empathy near the end. Unfortunately far too late, when harsher emotions have taken sway of him, but they are there.

I’ll admit to not anticipating that Mary Wollstonecraft‘s daughter would write all her female protagonists as sacrificial angels, but then she was a very young writer of her time.

I’ve been listening to this on Craftlit for the last few months, and I’m really pleased to have ‘read’ it this way, as I might not have got to it in print for another few years. In fact I’m reasonably likely to so far sooner now than I would have been otherwise. I don’t want to get into the arguments over whether listening to a book is the same as physically reading it. Suffice it to say that I believe this rather depends on the concentration one puts in. It is harder, but quite possible, to read a book without taking it in, just as one can allow an audiobook to just wash over one’s head. In any case, Heather’s commentary and extra information really helps my concentration on the audio files she plays.

If you haven’t come across Craftlit before, I heartily recommend it. Now is a good time to start, as having just finished Frankenstein, she is about to begin Little Women, although the older files are all available, and it is well worth finding the time to go back and listen to Pride and Prejudice, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, The Turn of the Screw, A Tale of Two Cities, Tristan and Isolde and the various shorter stories and pieces she podcasts between the longer novels. The audio files actually come from Librivox, so you can get them alone directly, but Heather‘s introductions and discussions really help me get more out of the experience (she was obviously a brilliant English Literature teacher), and her craft talk is interesting too. She also rerecords the occasional chapter that got through Librivox’ quality control undeservedly.

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