History’s Bigger Picture

73. England: An Aerial View by Adrian Warren & Dae Sasitorn
74. England: The Mini-Book of Aerial Views by Adrian Warren & Dae Sasitorn

These two books contain nearly all the same photographs, in a very similar order, but not precisely, and the pictures sometimes have different proportions or other final editing. The first book is a large (and heavy!) coffee table book, with very good historical overviews of the regions of England, with good captions next to each large photograph.

The Mini-Book has similar (but abbreviated) overviews and without the detailed captions, just the briefest few words giving the name and rough location of each. The photography in each are beautiful, and there are a few pictures that literally took my breath away (at least in the larger size). (NB I dithered over counting these as one read, but they aren’t precisely the same and I did read both.)

There is a Britain version of this pair of books, which I look forward to reasonably soon.

75. World Almanac Library of the Holocaust: Toward Genocide by David Downing
76. World Almanac Library of the Holocaust: The Nazi Death Camps by David Downing
77. World Almanac Library of the Holocaust: Persecution and Emigration by David Downing

I’m going to summarise the review of the three of these together as well, as reading them had me in tears, and I don’t want to go into the detail again right away. This is a very well put together series however (we have three more I haven’t got to yet), that gives plenty of sources (plenty for the purposes of teenagers and personal readers, at least) showing some of the major trends and effects of the Holocaust. It’s for a general audience, and ‘explains’ what happened briefly, explaining how much the individuals actually knew at the time, as well as what we know with hindsight. It’s clearly written, and allows for people dipping in and out of the book, although each of them reads well straight through. It quotes personal testimony, but doesn’t tell individual stories, as most of the Holocaust literature I’ve read does.

I amn’t looking forward to reading the rest of these, but I think it’ll be worthwhile.

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2 Responses to “History’s Bigger Picture”

  1. Amanda Says:

    I’m amazed at how fast you go through books! I love to read, but with a toddler around the house, my reading time has been relegated to 15-20 minutes before I finally decide to go to sleep. I’m on my third or fourth book of the year, lol, if you don’t count crochet books (and they are all over 700 pages).

  2. kaet Says:

    Oh well. I am reading a bit more than I might have otherwise, with the incentive of listing the books here, and I do get to (legitimately!) spend some of my work time on these books. Plus reading is necessary to my sense of well-being, and I am a fast reader, through a lifetime’s practice, I suppose. With novels I read about 100 pages per hour (but am currently in the middle of three several hundred pagers at once, which is why they aren’t finished!), and I don’t think I am consistent when it comes to speed of non-fiction. It simply depends on the text to picture/graph spread, and how much thought any of that takes.

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