Bruno and Books

Another hectic week of not blogging, but there have been lots of books. My flatmate got her thesis in, and the Crochet Liberation Front First Ever Book is out, as of Friday! I haven’t had my copy yet, but it should be here soon, and I’m really looking forward to it. I’m a published designer!!!! (If you’re a Ravelry member you can get it at a well discounted price by heading over to the CLF group and looking in the stickied thread.)

Bruno, our visiting travelling teddy, has been providing moral support during the week, helping to welcome our guests over Shabbos, and then coming shopping today. He helped me choose some buttons for the Cafetiere Cosy I finished nearly a week ago,
Bruno and buttons
and encouraged me to finish his belt,
Bruno croppedDSCF0500
once we got home. On the way he took advantage of the sunny weather to climb a tree.
Bruno in tree
cosy cafetiere

I’ve also read a good few books (mostly for children) in the last few days.
248. The Adventures of Robin Hood by Marcia Williams

I really liked Robin Hood stories when I was a child, and this has most of the classic stories of how the known Merry Men joined the outlaws (although interestingly Will Scarlet is in there, but his joining isn’t). The illustrations are fun, too. (The book is in comic strip/graphic novel format.)

249. Heartbeat by Sharon Creech

This one isn’t a standard novel either, as the whole tale is told in first person poems by adolescent Annie, who runs and draws her way through life, trying to make sense of her mother’s pregnancy, her friend and running partner Max’ moods, and her grandfather’s dementia. Annie is basically a happy well-adjusted child who wants to do what she enjoys simply for the enjoyment, rather than being pushed to compete and conform.

250. Arctic Hero: The Incredible Life of Matthew Henson by Catherine Johnson

I hadn’t heard of Matthew Henson before, but he seems a very interesting and inspiring character. He was an African-American Arctic explorer, and possibly the first to get to the North Pole (although it is now considered that the means of ascertaining one’s arrival there in 1909 cannot be trusted – still he according to this book he got as close as was then possible). At the same time, as a Black man in the USA back then his achievements went unacknowledged. This is a short easy biography, but now that I think of it, we may have a longer one in the library. I’ll have to take a look.

251. Kiss of Death by Malcolm Rose

Horror has never been a particularly favoured genre of mine, and though the continuity here mostly works, and it’s a well written tale, with some great and well-researched settings, I don’t think this will be changing my mind. It’s told from the point of view of Seth, whose class in school go on two school trips in close succession, at both of which his twin sister Kim and their friend Wes find and take artifacts they should never have removed. All three end up getting physically ill, to greater and lesser extents, and only Seth can put things right…

252. The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima & Nagasaki by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Manhattan District

This was recorded for the sixtieth anniversary of the events described, and it’s well worth listening to if you are interested in World War II, nuclear bombs, ‘Total War’, or the events more specifically. The earlier chapters can seem a bit dry in relation to such an event (although they are most informative), but the last two chapters counteract that tendency, as they are the personal account by a Catholic priest who lived in Nagasaki at the time of the bombing, describing that day and the ones following, with all the personal tragedy and infrastructural catastrophe involved.

And now, seeing as it’s taken me hours to complete this entry, I can show you that I’ve finally got around to stuffing Syd Rabbit, and doing up his body. I’d like to finish him this week (finishing two WIPs today has put me in that mood), and if that doesn’t look likely I might just decide he’s a pear (adding a stalk at the top) and have done!
Syd Rabbit pear

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2 Responses to “Bruno and Books”

  1. Kimmikat Says:

    Hi Kaet! Thank you for making Bruno’s holiday so much fun. Did he tell you he has family in Newcastle and Sunderland? I am staying there now for a week before returning home next Tuesday. I know he is safely in Germany now, but I am having difficulty catching up as my daughter’s computer (well the internet bit) is so slow. However, Guliver will be travelling again before the end of the week. I will post lots of piccies when I get back home. Thank you for Bruno’s scarf. It looks awesome! He looks thrilled with it. I hope he remembered his manners and thanked you for as great holiday.
    Hugs, Susie.

  2. kaet Says:

    Hi Susie

    Yes, Bruno was very well-mannered, and it was a pleasure having him visit. Looking forward to meeting Gulliver and the rest of the teddies!

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