Posts Tagged ‘game’

Book to game to book

Saturday, 15 January 2011

NaBloPoMo Jan2011We’re just finished setting up for my first game of Samurai Swords and it reminded me I hadn’t discussed this book yet. The game was originally titled “Shogun” itself, until the Clavell estate apparently objected and it was renamed. It is decidedly set at the time and along the theme of the book. We also have another game with a related theme, Ran, as well as a few real classic Japanese games, but we haven’t played the former yet, nor the latter in awhile.

Cover of "SHOGUN: A NOVEL OF JAPAN (CORON...

Cover via Amazon

50. Shogun by James Clavell

I must say I liked this book. I feel like it’s awhile since I’ve read a historical novel where I knew so little of the ‘real’ history being referenced, so I really can’t comment on its authenticity. I would now like to learn more about 16th century Japan, but don’t really know where to start. Suggestions are welcome!

One thing I liked is that while there is a central Western character, the book really isn’t about him. What it is about is power and politics at a time of technological change and increasing outside influence. At its core, though, is how much will and can the Samurai leadership use and accept non-Samurai ideas, inventions, manners and people, while definitively retaining their own culture and powerbase.

Advertisements

It’s March: NatCroMo 2009 is here!

Sunday, 1 March 2009

March 1 clue: round of brown and red trebles (UK), in front of two apples

The first clue of the second edition game is up already, and I’m giving you clues on here as well. Please join in and enjoy it!

We’ve got a discussion thread over on Ravelry as well, or comment here with your suggestions and thoughts.

It’s all over

Tuesday, 1 April 2008

Game Final!
This is my completed NatCroMo game. Thank you so much to everyone who has taken part and made this work. I wish I’d used colours that went better together, but I like all the yarns individually…

Now I have to finish the Seraphina, and then I can try out some of my inspiration from the game.

91. Contemporary Papier Mache: Colorful Sculpture, Jewelry, and Home Acessories by Gilat Nadivi

I don’t think I’ve done anything with papier mache since I was a child, but this book is making me want to give it another go. It has a wide variety of project suggestions, giving a sense of the range of possibilities available. It doesn’t let you forget how important paint is in most papier mache.

92. Animal Groups: Life in a Herd: Elephants by Richard & Louise Spilsbury

These two really have written a lot of books, haven’t they? They write well, and this is an informative and interesting read. Elephants are beautiful creatures of great dignity, and both are well shown in this book.

Back to what’s known to amuse

Sunday, 30 March 2008

I must admit to having finished the first of these (both of which I’ve read before) on Thursday, and the second yesterday, but unfortunately my computer and/or Firefox have been a bit slow over the weekend so I haven’t got much done. I should especially apologise for how late the NatCroMo game instructions were tonight. I really couldn’t fail to get them out tonight, after keeping it going all month, however. I hope tomorrow’s finale will be fun.

89. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

I’ve actually only read this once before, but it’s a very good book, and I’m glad I returned to it. Christopher is a very engaging character and narrator, and the unusual situations he gets himself into are very believable. Haddon skilfully has Christopher show us clearly how those around him get themselves in a pickle through their human foibles, as well as how Christopher himself cannot understand this.

90. Pure Ducky Goodness: The First Sheldon Collection by Dave Kellett

I get the daily email of the new Sheldon cartoon, but I got the four extant print books as well (all signed and two with individual sketches inside). I really like the format and concept, but mostly the humour! Flaco is my favourite character, but the rest of the guys (there aren’t any regular female protagonists, as I’ve just now realised…) are fun too. This first book introduces Sheldon, Gramp and Arthur the duck, as well as Sheldon’s friend Dante. (Oops, Flaco isn’t in this one. It’s still good!)

What’s going on?

Sunday, 23 March 2008

I’m off for a short break for the next two days, so I want to catch up with some stuff now. I am aiming to bring the laptop, and definitely the new camera, but in any case I could probably get online each day even if I don’t manage to.

85. The Game of Kings by Dorothy Dunnett

This has been one of my favourite novels (along with its sequels certainly my favourite series, by my favourite author) since I was about 14, and I was overdue on a reread (I have no idea how many times I’ve been through the series). Looking back, the most empathetic characters in this book don’t tend to recur in the further Lymond Chronicles (the two most compassionate, Christian Stewart – a real person, if I recall correctly (although I can’t find any evidence for this, and may well be incorrect) – and Gideon Somerville – certainly fictional – will be dead by the opening of Queen’s Play), but the intriguing ones all do, and tend to become more intriguing too.

I’ve probably had a very minor crush on Francis Crawford since I was fourteen, but with maturity, or even just a careful reading of the text, comes a realisation that he would be a very very difficult person to deal with day to day for most people. Unless you’re in a Catherine D’Albon role, perhaps. But that’s not until book 6 (Checkmate), and I really shouldn’t be referring to it here, just in case people only have read Game of Kings, as you really need the character development of the next five books for his love life to make sense. I’m wittering. Which is something Francis would certainly never do. (Except maybe near the end of this book when he’s with his brother.)

86. The Will by Chaim Greenbaum

Another of the multi-period Jewish novels (seriously, for a good while there are FIVE time periods being told – two during WWII, one in the 1960s and 70s, and two in different months of 2002) but it isn’t a bad thriller, and the morals make sense, mostly.

And now to my crochet, even though I haven’t done any over Purim or Shabbos.

The blanket is coming on. (And is pink, as my nice new camera recognises.)

The February mat is now into March, although not very far as I simply haven’t been keeping up with it. I was in a hurry to take this picture, so it isn’t lying flat at all. The shape of at least two of the sides is rather good.

The NatCroMo game is going well for everyone whose photos I’ve seen. Most of those are on Ravelry, but one person who isn’t on there yet has sent me some of her pictures, which I’m going to put in a separate post. Really beautiful.
I did take a very quick photo of the Seraphina’s Shawl, but the picture came out horrible, so you’ll have to wait until I can take a better one! Perhaps in daylight. I’ll be taking it to show my mother what I’m doing with the alpaca yarn she gave me.

Subsuming the Centre

Sunday, 16 March 2008

I’m still trying to get my scanner do a camera’s job, and so this picture shows the new stitches around the edge of my game piece well enough, while scrunching the middle rather badly.

As you can see, I haven’t really learnt to do bullion stitches well. I need to practise those to get them even.

72. Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley

Wow. This did not turn out quite as I had come to expect it to, from osmosis of the story through the general culture, or even from the earlier chapters. The Creature is both greyer and more black and white morally than I had anticipated, and while Victor Frankenstein remains emotionally immature he does display slight glimmerings of empathy near the end. Unfortunately far too late, when harsher emotions have taken sway of him, but they are there.

I’ll admit to not anticipating that Mary Wollstonecraft‘s daughter would write all her female protagonists as sacrificial angels, but then she was a very young writer of her time.

I’ve been listening to this on Craftlit for the last few months, and I’m really pleased to have ‘read’ it this way, as I might not have got to it in print for another few years. In fact I’m reasonably likely to so far sooner now than I would have been otherwise. I don’t want to get into the arguments over whether listening to a book is the same as physically reading it. Suffice it to say that I believe this rather depends on the concentration one puts in. It is harder, but quite possible, to read a book without taking it in, just as one can allow an audiobook to just wash over one’s head. In any case, Heather’s commentary and extra information really helps my concentration on the audio files she plays.

If you haven’t come across Craftlit before, I heartily recommend it. Now is a good time to start, as having just finished Frankenstein, she is about to begin Little Women, although the older files are all available, and it is well worth finding the time to go back and listen to Pride and Prejudice, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, The Turn of the Screw, A Tale of Two Cities, Tristan and Isolde and the various shorter stories and pieces she podcasts between the longer novels. The audio files actually come from Librivox, so you can get them alone directly, but Heather‘s introductions and discussions really help me get more out of the experience (she was obviously a brilliant English Literature teacher), and her craft talk is interesting too. She also rerecords the occasional chapter that got through Librivox’ quality control undeservedly.

Continuing the ongoing

Wednesday, 5 March 2008

I did more on the same three projects as yesterday, and I’m still happy with all of them. The FrouFrou has one cuff, and I now know how the edging works, so the other cuff and the front edging should go faster. It’s hot in the house and I’m tired, so I’ll try to do a big chunk on it tomorrow. The February mat is still in February, but is a good commuting project.

More and more other people are joining in on the NatCroMo game, and talking about it, so I’m delighted about that. There’s lots of other fun going on in the Ravelry group, too.

Project Progress sans Pics

Sunday, 2 March 2008

The FrouFrou is coming along really well – I finished the first front today, and have just started a second ball of yarn on the second, and my housemate tried it on and the sizing seems just right. The sleeves are purposefully a little short just now, so the the edging won’t make them too long. I think the overlap at the front won’t be as great as it is in the book pictures, but that seems to be the same for several of those other people on Ravelry have made, so I amn’t too worried.

The NatCroMo Game CAL piece is coming along fine too. There’s very little catching up to do for those still have to join in yet! 😉

I was going to borrow a camera again to show both off, as I still haven’t managed to take mine in for repair, but I’m too tired. Hopefully tomorrow. There’s a good bit of progress on my Seraphina to show too, if not from today.

National Crochet Month

Sunday, 2 March 2008

Or for me, that should be International, I think! Anyway, it comes from the Crochet Guild of America (CGOA) and over on Ravelry the CLF has spawned an offshoot NatCroMo group for the month of March 2008. I’ve taken on giving out instructions for a daily game/CAL, and I’ll be putting them on a page here on my blog (which is where the Ravelry pattern page should lead to) as well as on the Ravelry thread, so please do join in, whether you have got your invite for Ravelry yet or not. (And if you haven’t signed up for Rav yet as a current or beginning crocheter or knitter, whyever not?)